A Travellerspoint blog

Home ... at the moment

all seasons in one day

This is a fun post to show you where we are living at the moment.

As our Aarhus home exchange was cancelled (due to unexpected change of circumstances of our exchanger), we had to seek rental accommodation for our time here.

We were able to rent an apartment through airbnb for June. From our perspective it is quite expensive at AU $2400/month, especially as the home exchange offers not only free accommodation, but also a car exchange. So unfortunately it has been a major addition to our holiday expenses!!

It is small, quite basic, with a communal laundry (which is often the case with Danish apartments) ... but is very clean, and sufficient for our short stay. . However, when I saw the location we just had to choose it .. it is only an eight minute stroll from Aaron, Rikke and Olivia, and only minutes from the bus stop for going into town.

It has lovely light from the windows , but with the long summer days, it can mean going to bed in daylight. This pic was taken approx. 10.15pm, but I was up just after 3am the other evening (as one does!!) and it was quite light even then. However, I don't think I would handle the winter experience of the long darkness very well.
10.15pm summer light

10.15pm summer light

We also have a private home rental (at a much cheaper rate) for the remaining 6 weeks of our stay from 1 July, a little way out of town near a lovely lake.

Entrance from front door directly to dining area,  with stairway leading to lounge area

Entrance from front door directly to dining area, with stairway leading to lounge area


Kitchen .. very basic.

Kitchen .. very basic.


The bathroom is as big as the kitchen.  It also has lovely heated flooring .. great to warm your feet on a cold day!!

The bathroom is as big as the kitchen. It also has lovely heated flooring .. great to warm your feet on a cold day!!


Lounge area on second level

Lounge area on second level


Ladder to the loft ...  lucky we are fit!!

Ladder to the loft ... lucky we are fit!!


Our bedroom in the loft .. basically a mattress on the floor.    I love the Scandinavia style of each person having their own doona.  I don't have to share!   Have to be careful not to hit my head when getting in and out of bed, tho'.

Our bedroom in the loft .. basically a mattress on the floor. I love the Scandinavia style of each person having their own doona. I don't have to share! Have to be careful not to hit my head when getting in and out of bed, tho'.

Posted by patsaunder 02:39 Archived in Denmark Comments (0)

Skovmøllen

sunny

The reason we love to visit Moegaard Museum is not only because the exhibitions are interesting, but also because it is part of the Moesgaard Manor estate, located in the forests south of Aarhus, only 15mins from town. The estate covers 100 hectares of lovely landscape of park, forest, and open fields, which extends from the museum buildings down to the bay.

After several hours enjoying the museum exhibitions we needed a break, some exercise, and lunch at one of our favourite restaurants, Skovmøllen, about a 15 minute walk from the museum through the manor estate fields. . The name means 'Mill in the Forest' . The buildings, built in traditional style, comprise the retaurant and the mill which still operates occasionally (complete with a water wheel). It is a beautiful area, surrounded by the forest, and is very peaceful and calming.

Arcade of lime trees lead us through the fields

Arcade of lime trees lead us through the fields


Flowering tree along the walk

Flowering tree along the walk


One of our favourite restaurant - Skovmøllen

One of our favourite restaurant - Skovmøllen

Lunch was lovely, as always, and it was nice to relax and enjoy being back. Chas always has Stjerneskud (The Shooting Star). It is basically an open sandwich ... on a base of lightly fried buttered bread are two pieces of fish - one steamed, one crumbed - topped with shrimp, a dollop of mayonnaise, red caviar, and a slice of lemon - one of his fav Danish traditional meals. My fresh crisp green salad with interesting ingredients and unusual flavours was also delicious, as was the chilled beer. Delightful just to be here.

Lunch time

Lunch time

The manor estate extends over quite a large area. As you walk through the fields you come across a number of museum exhibits. These are ancient structures, mainly graves, which are dotted along the way It is fun to come across them as you wander. . This one is a reconstruction of what they archaelogists consider the first churches in Denmark may have looked like.

Reconstruction of early traditional church

Reconstruction of early traditional church


The old and the new

The old and the new

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Moesgaard Manor looking from the park

Moesgaard Manor looking from the park


After lunch nap

After lunch nap


Chas also needs an after lunch nap

Chas also needs an after lunch nap


The Giber River looking towards the forest

The Giber River looking towards the forest

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After our lunch break, we returned to the museum to continue our visit. But there's still more of this lovely area to be explored ... the beautiful forest, and the beach. .. dare I say 'another visit'.

Check out more pics here from a previous post Moesgaard - a lovely part of Aarhus

Posted by patsaunder 01:29 Archived in Denmark Comments (0)

Moesgaard Museum

sunny 18 °C

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Moesgaard Museum is one of our most favourite places in Aarhus. It is a museum which has an archaeological and ethnographic focus.

We visit every time we come to Aarhus, but this time was quite special as the exhibitions have a new home since our last visit. We had seen the design plans for the new architecturally designed museum building which opened in October last year, and were very excited to return to see how it had turned out.

The building itself is impressive .. especially as visitors have access to a grass covered roof to enjoy the view of the surrounding forest, the ocean, and the lovely Moesgaard Manor – the previous home of the museum.

Museum building

Museum building


Museum building

Museum building

However, on entering the entrance foyer one immediately comes face-to-face with the ancestors of the human race. Displayed on the staircase is a unique collection of anatomically precise models of human species reconstructed from scientifically researched archaeological finds of bones from around the world. One is able to walk right up to, and around them, and obtain a sense of where we have come from. Information on each was displayed, but unfortunately I did not record the details.

Standing sentinel at the exhibition entrance

Standing sentinel at the exhibition entrance


One of 'The Family'

One of 'The Family'


One of 'The Family'

One of 'The Family'


One of 'The Family'

One of 'The Family'


One of 'The Family'

One of 'The Family'

Also on the staircase are precise reconstructions of Paul Gurrumurruwuy (an Aboriginal Australian) and Stephen Hawking (the internationally acclaimed British physicist), with a very effective animated visual of water falling down the staircase with messages of where humans have come from and where we are going.

Paul Gurrumurruwuy-an Aboriginal Australian, and Stephen Hawking

Paul Gurrumurruwuy-an Aboriginal Australian, and Stephen Hawking


Words of wisdom .. past

Words of wisdom .. past


Words of wisdom - future

Words of wisdom - future


Words of wisdom  ..  our reason for being here.

Words of wisdom .. our reason for being here.

It is a stunning display .... and we haven't entered the exhibition areas yet!!

The Danes are exceptionally good at bringing museums alive. . We have visited several living museums where people actually perform the tasks and recreate the living conditions of a past time. But here at Moesgaard, they have very effectively used modern technology and multi-media with narratives, and settings with light, sounds and animations to display the lives of the species of the past.

The exhibitions are amazing ... not only due to the quality of materials used to display, the impressive quality and skilful presentation of the artefacts from around the world, and the opportunity to actively participate through video or audio presentations, ... but it is also the very subtle details that may go unnoticed (for example background music or narration) which add tremendously to the sense that one is experiencing something exceptional.

At a cost of AU$76,500,000 for the building, and a further AU$14,500,000 for the exhibitions, it is clear that this is an investment for the future.

The displays are broadly grouped as Bronze Age, Iron Age and Viking Age. The number, and quality of the artefacts presented, was excellent.

The exhibition include three Bronze Age graves dating back to about 1350 BC found in a town not far from Aarhus, the bodies of which lay in coffins of hollowed out oak tree trunks. Amazingly, the hair of one is still intact, as is the woven fabric in which they were buried.

Also on show is the 2,300 year old Grauballe Man, the world's best preserved bog body which was uncovered in 1952 from a peat bog near the village of Grauballe. It is the body of an adult male, aged 34 years, which dates from the late 3rdC BC during the Iron Age. The wounds on the body graphically illustrate that he was most likely killed by having his throat cut. His body was then placed into the bog where it was naturally preserved for over 2 thousand years. .This is one of the best preserved bog bodies every recorded. . The research conducted on the body was extensive as as no entire bog body had ever been preserved before. . The body has been on display in the museum since 1955. . We had seen this amazing exhibit in the old museum and had been looking forward to seeing it presented in its new home.

The Grauballe man

The Grauballe man


Up close and personal

Up close and personal

Multi-media exhibition area

Multi-media exhibition area


Bronze age arm bracelets and neck jewellery

Bronze age arm bracelets and neck jewellery


Example of animated exhibition displaying everyday life

Example of animated exhibition displaying everyday life


Unusual artefacts

Unusual artefacts


This (animated) exhibition depicted the development of Aarhus.  Shown here is the Cathedral (Domkirke) juxtaposed with the modern day Magasin department store.

This (animated) exhibition depicted the development of Aarhus. Shown here is the Cathedral (Domkirke) juxtaposed with the modern day Magasin department store.


Unique audio headphones ..   a sight more scary than the one behind.

Unique audio headphones .. a sight more scary than the one behind.

The 'Viking Age' interactive display provides an opportunity to journey by boat with the Vikings from Aros – the former name of the city of Aarhus. It brings the lives and times to life by following the destiny of seven passengers - a queen, a bishop, an adventurer, a merchant, an elderly woman, a child and his father. . The visitor chooses a key which is fitted with an electronic chip and linked to one of the characters. You then follow their personal story which is dramatised through the use of audio, film, and images. The models are lifelike and beautifully crafted and the attention to detail is exceptional.

One of the Seven Vikings

One of the Seven Vikings

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When writing my blog I usually do additional research so I can provide accurate information and terminology on the particular topic about which I am writing. In my google search of the new museum I came across an article in 'Antiquity Journal' written by an archaeologist, relating his experience of his visit to the museum. [[http://goo.gl/vJLe7z]Antiquity Journal] . I encourage you to have a look at his excellent photos (including the Bronze Age graves I mentioned above), and read his very interesting overview.

In his article he said "In any case, the sheer scale of the museum is prohibitive to description, so I will focus on impressions". . I agree. .It is impossible to share everything with you, which is why I've only mentioned a few of the exhibitions and artefacts. . You can come to the museum to learn much about the archaeological history of Denmark, and you will. . But the experience is much more than facts ... it is about the whole, which includes the emotional and sensory experience also. It is exceptional.

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On our visit we did not even get to see all of the permanent exhibitions. . I have not mentioned the temporary exhibition currently being hosted . The First Emperor – China’s Terracotta Army. . Of course this is a must see ... . a visit for another day.

Posted by patsaunder 07:26 Archived in Denmark Tagged buildings places history historical denmark Comments (0)

Springtime in the garden

semi-overcast 15 °C

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I just wanted to share with you some of the lovely spring flowers in Rikke and Aaron's garden ... flowers that we don't see often, especially in the warmer Queensland climate.

The many colours of the rhododendrons, the daisies and daffodils (earlier in spring) growing randomly in the grass, the apple trees providing both shade and delicious apples (from which Aaron makes his own cider), the chickens roaming around seeking insects and grubs, and the vibrant green of the grass. The roses in the front garden are only now beginning to bud so we look forward to another burst of colour later in the month.

It is beautiful to look out on a lovely array of colour.

(ps .. you get a much better sense of the photos if you click on the public gallery, and look at them in the large size )

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Rhododendrons and buds ready to flower

Rhododendrons and buds ready to flower

Rhododendrons

Rhododendrons

Rhododendrons

Rhododendrons

DSC04200

DSC04200

flowers

flowers

Chickens

Chickens

Chickens roaming free under the apple trees

Chickens roaming free under the apple trees

Daisies growing randomly through the grass

Daisies growing randomly through the grass

Daffodil stalks - Aaron is letting them die off before mowing to allow them to build their energy for next year's bulbs

Daffodil stalks - Aaron is letting them die off before mowing to allow them to build their energy for next year's bulbs

DSC04243-001

DSC04243-001

DSC04204

DSC04204

Lilac

Lilac

Bluebells

Bluebells

Front garden

Front garden

Tulips

Tulips

Poppies

Poppies

Posted by patsaunder 11:26 Archived in Denmark Tagged gardens flowers Comments (0)

Off to a slow start ...

semi-overcast

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Unfortunately, Chas and I have had a slow start to our trip. . Our three days in Hong Kong did not start well. . After arriving 6pm, spending 1-1/2hrs with the formalities, and another 1-1/2hrs bus trip we finally arrived at our accommodation at 9pm .. tired and hungry! We were looking forward to the warmer weather in HK with forecasted temperatures of 24-28C. . But of course all the buildings are air-conditioned, so we were cold and very uncomfortable!! . We even had to cancel our HK island tour as Chas was not well.

It was a very low key visit ... we do not feel we experienced Hong Kong at all. Maybe next time.

Welcome to Hong Kong

Welcome to Hong Kong

As Chas was still in recovery mode, our three day stay at Bricket Wood (St Albans) with his friend, Roger (from their York Uni days many moons ago) was enjoyable but relaxed ... no stress, no rush. . However, a traditional pub lunch was the first item on Chas's agenda ... now it feels like 'home'.

Our first British pub lunch with Roger

Our first British pub lunch with Roger

Roger and Chas

Roger and Chas

As Roger is a keen historian, he enjoyed taking us to the Verulamium Museum, a museum of everyday Roman Britain on the actual site of a Roman town Verulamium, . We also had a wander around London, visiting Westminster Abbey and the Banqueting House.

Photography is not allowed in the Abbey so I have none to show ... however, since 1066 it has been the coronation church, and is the final resting place of seventeen monarchs. . It is very possible that we will see another coronation in the Abbey in the next decade or so.

There are 3,300 people buried or commemorated at Westminster Abbey, many of them among the most significant in Britain's history. I was very pleased to see Australia acknowledged with Adam Lindsay Gordon, one of our most famous poets, commemorated with a plaque in 'Poets Corner', along with some of Britain's finest ... Shakespeare, William Blake, the Bronte sisters, Robbie Burns, Lewis Carroll, and many others.

Chas wanted to see the new (2002) stained glass window commemorating Christopher Marlow (Britain's famous playwright) .. which is why he chose to visit the Abbey over the many other interesting landmarks in London.

He was also keen to visit the Banqueting House .. which I had never heard of!!. . Built in 1622, it is the only remaining part of the Palace of Whitehall. It was somewhat nondescript, but the most significant aspect of the building is the spectacular ceiling painted by Rebens in 1635 ... his only surviving in-situ ceiling painting. Images of ceiling

The Banqueting House was created by James I, who after his death was succeeded by his son, Charles I. Unfortunately (for Charles) it was he who gave the building it's other major point of interest .... on the afternoon of 30 January 1649 he stepped out of a first floor window onto the scaffold which had been erected outside for the purpose of his execution. Short history ... early days of protestantism, dissolution of parliament, dissenters had their ears cut off, civil war, the pilgrim fathers had had enough and decided to leave for America. Obviously a traumatic time in England's history that caused the King to be deemed a traitor and beheaded.

Maybe it is just the 'Aussie' in me but when I visit these magnificent, historical structures I usually come away with mixed feelings and somewhat overwhelmed by the history, art, and grandeur.

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But finally we were in Aarhus and it was wonderful to be with Rikke, Aaron and Olivia again.

Rikke, Aaron and Olivia

Rikke, Aaron and Olivia

It didn't take long for Olivia to settle with Chas and I. Which was great as I had my 'first ever' nanna-sitting experience on the Friday evening when Rikke and Aaron had a night out attending a concert .. which went very well I might add. After reading four 'Mr. Men' books ('Yes, four' she was very keen to tell Dad), she was tucked into bed and went quickly to sleep. Looking forward to a lifetime of many such wonderful experiences with her.

I also had a visit to Olivia's kindy. When she saw me at the door she ran over, gave me a quick hug, took my hand and promptly showed me all the interesting places in the kindy, the outside play area, and also introduced me to her friends. . It was very sweet. Her English is amazing. She will occasionally pause while speaking and it is interesting to watch her search for a word, which she inevitably is able to remember.

Kindy

Kindy

However, Chas and my motivation and energy continued to be low, probably due to a mix of jet lag, both of us not feeling 100%, and the miserable cold, wet and windy weather ... summer in Denmark!! . So we again took things slowly, adjusting to Aarhus by reorienting ourselves to our surroundings and enjoying lunch each day in our favourite restaurants.

But .. we are now settled in our own apartment, only a few streets from Aaron and Rikke's house. So we can visit, enjoy dinner, great discussion, a couple of drinks and then take a relaxed walk home in the lovely extended daylight of a Danish summer evening.

Posted by patsaunder 13:28 Archived in Denmark Comments (0)

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