A Travellerspoint blog

Aarhus Women's Museum (Kvindemuseet)

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Aarhus' Women's Museum is one of the world's few women's history museums with the focus firmly on women's lives. I do not know of any other women's museum. I have certainly not visited any other. This is a very unique and interesting museum. The exhibitions are displayed over three floors of the lovely historic old city hall (1857).

The Women's Museum

The Women's Museum


Museum poster

Museum poster


Display on the outside wall of the museum.

Display on the outside wall of the museum.

This year, 2015, the museum celebrates the 100 year anniversary of two very important events in Danish women's history.

Young Women's Voices ... In 1915 only 14% of the population had the vote ... and only men ... in accordance with the then constitution. There was widespread distrust of common people in general, and women's ability to deal with, and take responsibility for, the larger issues of society. Five groups were excluded from democratic citizenship ... women, servants, paupers, criminals and fools.

After many battles, and by forming alliances with men already in parliament, a majority vote brought changes to the Constitution, which finally made it possible for all men and women who were Danish citizens over 25 years, and with a fixed address, to vote and be elected to the Danish Parliament. This change was significant as it allowed a large number of 'untrained' voters all at once into the power which had previously belonged to a minority.

There was an excellent video on display showing a procession of a large number of women walking through the streets. I'm not sure if it was a protest, or a celebration of their achievement in 1915. However, it was powerful to see and to reflect on the courage they showed in daring to challenge the status quo.

With a focus on three young women of the time, the exhibition invites women to consider their own position in relation to the value of democracy, equality and career.

The poster displaying the year in which women obtained the vote across the globe is especially poignant. New Zealand first in 1883, then Australia (Commonwealth) 1902 (white women only), but South Australia was first in 1895, then Western Australia 1899. Kuwait 2005. Saudi Arabia and the Vatican City are two countries that still lag behind in equal voting rights.

Listing of the year women achieved the right to vote in various countries around the world.

Listing of the year women achieved the right to vote in various countries around the world.

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Fighting for Peace ... this exhibition reflects on the founding of the International League for Peace and Freedom, during WW1, when 1200 women from 11 countries (including women from Denmark) gathered in The Hague from 27-29 April 1915 to protest the ongoing war, and to discuss what they could do to stop the havoc of war. Their message: "We, the mothers and wives of Europe, will no longer tolerate this insane killing. We demand peace .. demand it with the holy right of mothers."

The League still continues, and has this year been nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize. This exhibition honors the fact that Danish women have continued to participate in peace work since that first Congress in 1915.

The close link between feminism and the fight for peace is also addressed. As the culture of war reinforces the privileges of the powerful and enhances exploitation, the exhibition illustrates that war and conflicts often involving sexual abuse and the trafficking of women, stating that, on a global scale prostitution is the second largest business only surpassed by military expenses.

Unfortunately the world remains as war-ridden as ever.

Beautiful interpretation of the League's symbol painted on silk

Beautiful interpretation of the League's symbol painted on silk

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The history of Childhood ... this exhibition is a trip down memory lane of a Danish childhood, surprisingly similar to one in Australia with similar toys, educational resources and clothing. The exhibition allows children to actively participate by climbing on the displays, writing on the walls, and trying on the old clothing. It also allows the visitor to choose a card showing information relating to a specific individual. You can follow in their footsteps by hunting for their items identified on the reverse of the card. I thought this another example of the Danes ability to showcase the exhibits very effectively.

School room and resources

School room and resources


Example of children's toys

Example of children's toys


Carl, born 1865

Carl, born 1865


Hunt to find these items relating to your chosen individual

Hunt to find these items relating to your chosen individual


Shoes, including local clogs

Shoes, including local clogs


Children's clothing - very well displayed

Children's clothing - very well displayed

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City Council Hall ... While women obtained the right to vote in national elections in 1915, they gained the right for municipal elections in 1908. This exhibit displays artefacts and memorabilia from 1909 when Dagmar Pedersen became a member of the city council as the first woman in Aarhus. The green table in the central room is the original furniture where members came together. However, photos show that even though women had won the right to vote and be elected, for many years men were far more represented .

It is ironic that while the building was Initially erected as the City Hall in 1857 as a place for powerful men, it is now a women's museum.

Multi-level digital cutout of Dagmar Pedersen

Multi-level digital cutout of Dagmar Pedersen


It all comes together

It all comes together


The green table in the central room of the City Hall as it was in 1909

The green table in the central room of the City Hall as it was in 1909

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Final display ... the last exhibition displayed a range of personal items of a women in early 20thC. Again very well displayed and interesting.

The exhibition room

The exhibition room


Personal clothing

Personal clothing


Dresses, jackets and hats

Dresses, jackets and hats


Dresses, jackets, handbags and gloves

Dresses, jackets, handbags and gloves


Lovely display of personal items

Lovely display of personal items


Personal items

Personal items


Items relating to contraception and menstruation

Items relating to contraception and menstruation


Sewing room and equipment

Sewing room and equipment

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We always enjoy lunch at the cafe when visiting the museum. It has an olde worlde charm, and the food is lovely.

Lovely atmosphere of the museum cafe decorated with selected items from exhibits. Lovely food, mainly organic ingredients.

Lovely atmosphere of the museum cafe decorated with selected items from exhibits. Lovely food, mainly organic ingredients.

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Old City Hall - historical building.

Old City Hall - historical building.


The old washer woman

The old washer woman


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Posted by patsaunder 01:45 Archived in Denmark Tagged historical denmark Comments (0)

Aarhus Cathedral (Domkirke)

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Aarhus Domkirke has stood as the dominant structure in the city since the late 12thC, albeit with rebuilding, and changes in style over the centuries. At 93m, it is the longest church in Denmark.

It has been dedicated to St Clement, the patron saint of the town of Aarhus, and of Aarhus Cathedral, since its beginning. He was Pope from 92-101, and according to legend, was thrown into the sea with an anchor around his neck. Therefore, the anchor has become his symbol, as depicted on the cathedral tower.

There are many beautiful art works to see in the cathedral. For example, the beautiful frescoes which adorn the walls. The cathedral has the largest total area of walls and arches covered by the frescoes from before the reformation (16thC) (including one that is the largest in Denmark). They were all made between 1470 and 1520, except one which is from ~1300.

The Altar .. was inaugurated into the church in 1479, and is the most precious work of art in the church. It comprises three sets of panels each of which is displayed at certain times of the year, e.g. The Feast Day panels (a carved work coated with 23.5carat gold) are displayed from Christmas morning until Ash Wednesday, The Passiontide from Ash Wednesday Until Easter morning. The Feast Day panels return and remain until Advent, when the Advent panels are disclosed until Christmas Eve. They were restored in 1975-81 and now appear as they were when presented to St Clement's Cathedral in 1479.

Also, The Votive Ship .... dating 1720 ... and with an interesting story. It is believed it was built in Holland for The Russian Tsar, Peter the Great, who had ordered warships from Holland. Instead of doing drawings of their ships, the shipyard made a model that was sent to Russia. Unfortunately the ship carrying the model encountered a violent storm off the tip of Denmark. It was wrecked, but the model drifted ashore almost undamaged. It was purchased by fishermen from Aarhus who donated it to the Cathedral. It is amazing to think it was built as a model ... at 2.65m long, 3.5m tall, it is the largest votive ship in any Danish church. The attention to detail is amazing. Denmark is a seafaring country, so all aspects of the sea are part of Danish psyche.
(ps ... A votive ship, sometimes called a church ship, is a ship model displayed in a church. They serve as thanks for the protection on the sea, and are constructed and given as gifts to the church by seamen and ship builders.)

The Golden Portals .. these are wrought-iron latticework portals made by a German master smith. There are five in the cathedral, with the most striking consisting of four panels. The workmanship is beautiful.

The Pulpit ... erected in 1588, it is carved in oak. Nine stories from the Old and New Testament are depicted.

The Font ... made of bronze it was cast in 1481 in a little town in north Germany. It depicts four scenes .. The Baptism, The Crucifixion, Christ on the Day of Judgement, and the Coronation of Mary. Between these nine apostles are represented, with the font 'legs' depicting the four Evangelists. The detail is astounding.

The Principal Organ ... originally built 1730, it has been enhanced several times up to 1983. It is the largest organ in Denmark. However, the Cathedral also has another organ which is used for weddings, services, and the amazing concert series which is held over the summer. On the day we visited one of the organists was practicing. Nice.

In all a magnificent structure, with the most amazing art works, all completed by masters of their time.

Aarhus Domkirke

Aarhus Domkirke


The Domkirke dominates the city

The Domkirke dominates the city


Beautiful designs on the cathedral tower.  Note the anchor  ..  St Clement's symbol

Beautiful designs on the cathedral tower. Note the anchor .. St Clement's symbol


Largest frescoe, depicting St Christopher and St Clement

Largest frescoe, depicting St Christopher and St Clement

Detail of frescoe

Detail of frescoe


St George and the Dragon frescoe

St George and the Dragon frescoe


Frescoes adorning the arches

Frescoes adorning the arches


Aarhus Domkirke alterpiece .. I think this is the 'Feast Day' panel.

Aarhus Domkirke alterpiece .. I think this is the 'Feast Day' panel.


The Domkirke Altar

The Domkirke Altar


Cathedral pew

Cathedral pew


Aarhus Domkirke beauitful arches

Aarhus Domkirke beauitful arches


Arches

Arches


The Votive Ship

The Votive Ship


The Votive Ship

The Votive Ship


Bronze font

Bronze font


Bautiful craftsmanship

Bautiful craftsmanship


The Principal Organ

The Principal Organ


Second Organ

Second Organ


An art style depicted in many Danish churches

An art style depicted in many Danish churches


Detail

Detail


Example of Golden Portals

Example of Golden Portals


The Pulpit

The Pulpit

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Posted by patsaunder 02:11 Archived in Denmark Tagged churches art buildings historical denmark Comments (0)

3 churches in one

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Old churches are always a drawcard for me when we travel .. not from a religious, but an historical, perspective. I try to imagine the people, and how they participated in the church, which would have been an important influence in their lives. The art works are usually amazing also, and very important. . It seems that each little church you visit will have a surprise of some sort.

When wandering through Aarhus, you cannot miss 'The Church of Our Lady'. It is a large building set in a peaceful location in the middle of Aarhus. It is a lovely church which fits easily into the hustle and bustle of a busy city, and all the activity going on around it.

The Church of Our Lady

The Church of Our Lady

However, I feel that as it fits so well into the environment, it can easily go unnoticed, but it is definitely worth taking time to visit, as there is not one, but three churches together on this site, each of which is special.

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Church of Our Lady (Vor Frue Kirke)
The current church has been shaped by a lot of history. . The site had been the home of previous churches over time, with records noting an earlier wooden church which burnt down in 1051. In 1240 the Dominican Order took over what was the church of St Nicolas, and built a monastery in which the present church was the south wing. It was renamed after the reformation (~1500s). The present church was built around 1250, with additions (choir, sacristy, nave and tower) at various times up to 1500. Restoration was done in 1950s, during which they found the Crypt Church (below)

The altarpiece, carved by Claus Berg (a famous German sculptor and painter) about 1530, is still in the church today. On reading the info brochure I was surprised to learn that during Lent the altar front piece is closed revealing the backside of the wings which depicts another amazing piece of art. Considering the reputation of the sculptor, the Parish is very fortunate to have two pieces of his work. (I couldn't find an image of the reverse unfortunately).

While the decoration in the church is quite simple, the lovely frescoes on the walls are beautiful and really lift it.

Example of frescoes in Church of Our Lady

Example of frescoes in Church of Our Lady


The simple decoration of The Church of Our Lady, looking towards altarpiece.   Note the lovely frescoes on the walls.

The simple decoration of The Church of Our Lady, looking towards altarpiece. Note the lovely frescoes on the walls.


Altarpiece, Church of Our Lady, dated c.1500

Altarpiece, Church of Our Lady, dated c.1500

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The Crypt Church
This small, but beautiful, church was rediscovered beneath the Church of our Lady during renovations in 1955, and dates to approximately 1060 AD. It is the oldest stone building in Scandinavia.

Entrance to the crypt is down a set of stairs in the middle of the Church of our Lady. The walls were built from a mixture of stone and limestone, and remnants of frescoes still remain. .The newer churches were then built around the crypt church. During the restoration the graves of an adult and a child were found, and the gravestones can be seen in the floor.

The Crypt Church

The Crypt Church


The Crypt Church

The Crypt Church

In the middle of the apse is an accurate copy of an old Roman crucifix from a church outside Aarhus. I love this crucifix .. it really appeals to me. We saw another copy of it at the Moesgaard Museum, but the original is safely housed in the National Museum in Copenhagen.

Crucifix insitu

Crucifix insitu


Detail of Crypt Church crucifix

Detail of Crypt Church crucifix

The crypt church was reconsecrated in November 1957 and continues to be used for services.

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Abbey Church
On previous visits we had missed the Abbey Church which adjoins Our Lady's, the entrance to which was formerly the entrance to the monastery built in the second half of the 12thC. It is a small but impressive church with six cross vaults held up by two columns and pillars. Equally impressive are the frescoes dating from 1517. Rediscovered in 1927, they were restored in 1954.

Further restoration was done in 2000 when the church was reconsecrated and a lovely new east window inserted. Evening services are still held in this lovely church, which is noted as "one of the most elegant and festive in all monastery architecture" (info brochure).

Lovely cross vaulting, the Abbey Church

Lovely cross vaulting, the Abbey Church


Beautiful fresco, The Abbey Church

Beautiful fresco, The Abbey Church


Magnificent frescoes in the Abbey Church

Magnificent frescoes in the Abbey Church


Window, the Abbey Church

Window, the Abbey Church

Posted by patsaunder 01:51 Archived in Denmark Tagged churches art buildings historical denmark Comments (0)

Home ... at the moment

all seasons in one day

This is a fun post to show you where we are living at the moment.

As our Aarhus home exchange was cancelled (due to unexpected change of circumstances of our exchanger), we had to seek rental accommodation for our time here.

We were able to rent an apartment through airbnb for June. From our perspective it is quite expensive at AU $2400/month, especially as the home exchange offers not only free accommodation, but also a car exchange. So unfortunately it has been a major addition to our holiday expenses!!

It is small, quite basic, with a communal laundry (which is often the case with Danish apartments) ... but is very clean, and sufficient for our short stay. . However, when I saw the location we just had to choose it .. it is only an eight minute stroll from Aaron, Rikke and Olivia, and only minutes from the bus stop for going into town.

It has lovely light from the windows , but with the long summer days, it can mean going to bed in daylight. This pic was taken approx. 10.15pm, but I was up just after 3am the other evening (as one does!!) and it was quite light even then. However, I don't think I would handle the winter experience of the long darkness very well.
10.15pm summer light

10.15pm summer light

We also have a private home rental (at a much cheaper rate) for the remaining 6 weeks of our stay from 1 July, a little way out of town near a lovely lake.

Entrance from front door directly to dining area,  with stairway leading to lounge area

Entrance from front door directly to dining area, with stairway leading to lounge area


Kitchen .. very basic.

Kitchen .. very basic.


The bathroom is as big as the kitchen.  It also has lovely heated flooring .. great to warm your feet on a cold day!!

The bathroom is as big as the kitchen. It also has lovely heated flooring .. great to warm your feet on a cold day!!


Lounge area on second level

Lounge area on second level


Ladder to the loft ...  lucky we are fit!!

Ladder to the loft ... lucky we are fit!!


Our bedroom in the loft .. basically a mattress on the floor.    I love the Scandinavia style of each person having their own doona.  I don't have to share!   Have to be careful not to hit my head when getting in and out of bed, tho'.

Our bedroom in the loft .. basically a mattress on the floor. I love the Scandinavia style of each person having their own doona. I don't have to share! Have to be careful not to hit my head when getting in and out of bed, tho'.

Posted by patsaunder 02:39 Archived in Denmark Comments (0)

Skovmøllen

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The reason we love to visit Moegaard Museum is not only because the exhibitions are interesting, but also because it is part of the Moesgaard Manor estate, located in the forests south of Aarhus, only 15mins from town. The estate covers 100 hectares of lovely landscape of park, forest, and open fields, which extends from the museum buildings down to the bay.

After several hours enjoying the museum exhibitions we needed a break, some exercise, and lunch at one of our favourite restaurants, Skovmøllen, about a 15 minute walk from the museum through the manor estate fields. . The name means 'Mill in the Forest' . The buildings, built in traditional style, comprise the retaurant and the mill which still operates occasionally (complete with a water wheel). It is a beautiful area, surrounded by the forest, and is very peaceful and calming.

Arcade of lime trees lead us through the fields

Arcade of lime trees lead us through the fields


Flowering tree along the walk

Flowering tree along the walk


One of our favourite restaurant - Skovmøllen

One of our favourite restaurant - Skovmøllen

Lunch was lovely, as always, and it was nice to relax and enjoy being back. Chas always has Stjerneskud (The Shooting Star). It is basically an open sandwich ... on a base of lightly fried buttered bread are two pieces of fish - one steamed, one crumbed - topped with shrimp, a dollop of mayonnaise, red caviar, and a slice of lemon - one of his fav Danish traditional meals. My fresh crisp green salad with interesting ingredients and unusual flavours was also delicious, as was the chilled beer. Delightful just to be here.

Lunch time

Lunch time

The manor estate extends over quite a large area. As you walk through the fields you come across a number of museum exhibits. These are ancient structures, mainly graves, which are dotted along the way It is fun to come across them as you wander. . This one is a reconstruction of what they archaelogists consider the first churches in Denmark may have looked like.

Reconstruction of early traditional church

Reconstruction of early traditional church


The old and the new

The old and the new

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Moesgaard Manor looking from the park

Moesgaard Manor looking from the park


After lunch nap

After lunch nap


Chas also needs an after lunch nap

Chas also needs an after lunch nap


The Giber River looking towards the forest

The Giber River looking towards the forest

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After our lunch break, we returned to the museum to continue our visit. But there's still more of this lovely area to be explored ... the beautiful forest, and the beach. .. dare I say 'another visit'.

Check out more pics here from a previous post Moesgaard - a lovely part of Aarhus

Posted by patsaunder 01:29 Archived in Denmark Comments (0)

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